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Pay to Play: Common sense tips to help you improve your Google Adwords Quality Score

One of the most frustrating aspects for novice pay-per-click (PPC) marketers is the so-called ad quality score—a method search engines use to measure the relevancy of an ad for a particular keyword. The ad quality score affects the minimum bid price, position and display eligibility. Poor ads cost a lot more and are less likely to be displayed than highly relevant ones, giving advertisers a strong incentive to manage their ads responsibly.

Unfortunately, the exact way search engines measure this score has remained a secret. But a few months ago, Bill identified a set of patents that give us a detailed look under the hood at how these numbers might be computed. Read more

Advanced Adwords bidding strategies

In Yesterday's Search Day article: Are Bid Management Tools Dead?, Eric Enge, writes some interesting facts and conclusions he brought from SMX.

A solid strategy for your PPC campaigns will have the following elements:
  1. Use a bid management tool to manage the long tail of your campaign.
  2. Stay focused on your ad copy and your landing pages, because they can dramatically influence the cost and conversion rates of your campaigns.
  3. Take significant brand building terms and manage them separately
  4. Take significant "first visit search" keywords and manage them separately as well.

While I think it is no longer necessary to manage large lists of long tail keywords for PPC campaigns (thanks to broad matching options), I do see great value in bid optimizing tools on improving the ROI of your PPC campaigns. Read more

Long tail for PPC?

If you have read a lot about search marketing and specifically pay per click, you have probably heard about the phrase “long tail keywords”.

I was fortunate enough to learn about this early and I was able to exploit it very well in Overture — now Yahoo Search Marketing.

The idea is to try to focus on all of the possible variations of a keyword that people use when searching, specifically phrases with 3 or more words, and not try to compete for the single word or two word keyword, for example “buy nice car in florida” instead of “buy car” or “cars.”  Getting enough long tail keywords can potentially get you the same or close to the same level of traffic, but at a much lower cost, and with more conversions as people that type single word phrases are more in research mode.

When I started doing PPC in Google back in 2002, I immediately tried to use the same techniques I used so successfully in Overture.  Later I realized that it was not necessary. Read more