Posts

A Radically New Concept in Keyword Research

SEO expert and blogger Donna Fontenot recently honored me with a positive review of my recently launched software, RankSense. I must admit that I was not born a salesman and I detest hype and hyperbole, so it feels great when my peers see the value in what I am trying to bring to the market. Thanks Donna and thanks Tad for your reviews. Although I have worked closely with top copywriter, Paul Robb (winner of the SEOmoz landing page competition), and my clever technical writer and editor, Benjamin Zadik, to create persuasive copy for our product site, I have to admit that there is still a lot of work to do explaining the true benefits of the software (and in some measure, the benefits of SEO).

If you have read some of my posts, you know that I don’t like to do what everybody else is doing and I think that reflects strongly in the way I designed the software. For instance, if you have used any of the keyword research tools on the market, you know that there is little that differentiates one from the other. Most do the same thing: find the keywords people are actively searching for, measure their competitiveness, assess their value, and so on. RankSense is different.

In this post I would like to go deeper into what I believe is one of the most powerful and useful features of RankSense—a radically different keyword research module. Read more

Writing for People (and Search Engines): How to improve click-through rates for organic listings

Another new year has come and many of us are still analyzing the balance of successes and failures of the previous one. It is definitely a useful chore. I am happy to count this blog as one of my successes. It was humbling to see it included in SearchEngineLand’s blogroll and nominated for Best SEO Research blog—I voted for Bill’s and I am glad he won the title :-)—among other accomplishments. Thanks to everyone for the recognition!

On the other hand, last year I had more goals that I didn’t quite reach than ones that I did, although I suppose that puts me in the big crowd. :-) I like to start each year by revisiting the unachieved goals, the uncompleted projects, the planned-but-not-executed things I call my missed opportunities. One common one (and I am sure many of my peers experienced the same) is maximizing the number of clicks I get from organic listings. The problem, as many might be asking themselves, is how to measure the organic click-through rate in the first place! Read on to learn how…. Read more

A detailed look at what can (and can’t) be automated in SEO

robot_flower.jpgIn my post about SEO automation, SEO expert Halfdeck expressed concern about the possibility of customers preferring a sophisticated SEO tool over a highly-trained SEO professional. I am sure many of my peers had the same thought running through their heads when they saw my post on Sphinn. The post even made it to the front page!

The reality is that we should embrace software progress in our field. We should look at software improvements and innovations as tools that can help us scale our own business and be more successful. Is it bad to use SEO software that does all the tedious work and helps us serve 20 clients per month instead of 10?

Man vs. Machine

If we look at the last 100 years, man has achieved an incredible amount of progress. Every invention brings a new level of comfort. You can do many things far easier, faster and more efficiently than before. There is an irreversible momentum in this direction.

The fear of computers replacing the work we do is not unfounded, of course. Machines are replacing human labor everyday. The more repetitive the work, the easier it is to get a machine to do it for you. On the other hand, the more creative and more social the task is, the harder it is for a computer to replicate.

There is software for almost any professional activity that we do, yet we (the professionals) are still in high demand. Nobody is going to trust his or her business to a computer blindly, after all. If something goes wrong, who would they complain to? ;-)

So the question becomes: do we resist change, or adapt and thrive? Read more

SEO can be automated!

rs_scsmall.jpg … partially

Loren Baker has asked a thought-provoking question: “Can SEO be automated?” Coincidentally he asks the question just a day after we released a product at TechCrunch40 with just such a goal.

It seems that the folks at Commerce360 are working to build a product similar to our RankSense. There is a fundamental difference in approach, however. We are not trying to replace the human element; we are trying to make humans work far easier and simpler. Truthfully, I don’t even think their goal of fully-automated SEO is possible. In many ways search engine optimization is plain old marketing—and marketing is driven by creativity. No machine can quite claim to be creative just yet. Read more

LinkingHood v0.2 – Find all your supplemental pages with ease

linkinghood2.jpgAs it is well known by now, Google decided to remove the supplemental label from pages it adds to its supplemental index. That is unfortunate because pages that are labeled this way need some “link lovin’.” How are we going to give those pages the love they need if we are not able to identify them in the first place?

In this post, I want to take a look at some of the alternatives we have to identify supplemental pages. WebmasterWorld has exposed a new query that displays such results, but nobody knows how long it is going to last. Type this into your Google search box: site:hamletbatista.com/& and you’ll see my supplemental pages. I tested it before and after Google removed the label and I'm getting the same pages. Read more

LongTailMiner v0.1 alpha — find invisible Long Tail keywords

I’m really enjoying this blogging thing! Every comment I am getting from my readers is a new idea that I feel rushed to put into practice.

My reader, Andrea, mentioned she parses log files to mine for keywords as well. That is an excellent idea.

I decided to put that idea into code and here is a new tool to mine for long tail keywords.

To make really good use of it, I would setup a PPC campaign in Google with a “head keyword” in broad match, bidding at the minimum possible. Make sure your ads maintain good click-through rates (over 0.5%) to avoid getting disabled. Run it for a week or two (preferably more) and you will have a good number of search referrals and “long tail keywords” that people are actually looking for. You can later create good content pages that include those keywords. In most cases, long tail keywords are really easy to rank with on-page optimization only.

I will probably write a Youmoz entry with more detailed instructions on how to take advantage of this. In this way I can get more people to try it and get really valuable feedback.

Read more

LinkingHood v0.1 alpha — Improve your PageRank distribution

As I promised to one of my readers, here is the first version of the code to mine log files for linking relationship information.

I named it LinkingHood as the intention is to take link juice from the rich to give to the poor linking sites.

I wrote it in Python for clarity ( I love Python :-) ) . I was working on an advanced approach involving matrices and linear algebra. After reading some of the feedback regarding the article, it gave birth to a new idea. To make it easier to explain, I decided to use a simpler approach . This code would definitely need to be rewritten to use matrices and linear algebraic operations. (More about that in a later post). For scalability to sites with 10,000 or more pages, this is primarily an illustration and does everything in memory. It’s also extremely inefficient in its current form.

I simply used a dictionary of sets. The keys are the internal pages and the sets are the list of links pointing to those pages. I tested it with my tripscan.com log file and included the results of a test-run.

Read more

The power of custom built software

One of the key things that helped me move quickly to super affiliate — I started earning 5 figures per month after six months — was the fact that I knew how to create scripts and systems to help me do the repetitive stuff.

I usually did everything manually first, and once I could see that the process was profitable, and that I could automate it, I focused on developing a custom software solution.  This gave me a huge competitive edge.

When I started, it was possible to get high rankings by trading enough links with the right anchor text; search engines are little bit smarter now.  I remember I created a handful of Perl scripts to research and find a lot of links, and an Internet Explorer toolbar to help me with filling the link exchange forms.  Those tools saved me a lot of time!

If you start doing something that is profitable and you think that automating it can help you grow faster; do it.  If you don’t have the skills to do it yourself; hire someone to do it. There are a lot of freelancers that can do it really cheap.