Posts

Keepers and Sneezers: Two signals of branding success

The power of branding

bigsneeze.jpgI talked about defensible traffic in my previous post, but ultimately all your traffic sources can disappear, leaving you only with the visitors that remember your site, the ones that do not need to follow a link or click on a Google Ad. For me, those visitors are an excellent measure of the true success of my sites. Those visitors represent the strength of my brand.

There are two clear signals that tell me how strong a brand is: direct traffic and brand searches. Direct traffic visitors are visitors that simply type the URL or domain name in their browser. These visitors know the site. Brand search visitors are usually visitors that are not Web-savvy and go everywhere by searching. At least they remember the name of the site, but they don't remember the domain extension.

Both are indications that the site name is on the mind of the visitor. They are keepers: if every other traffic method disappeared, you will still get those visitors. Read more

Grade School Blogger: Seeking attention through controversy

fight.jpgFor marketers, branding is an easy concept. For me, as a technical guy, it took me a while to get it.

The more people aware that you or your product exists, the better the chance that they will buy from you. Simple, right?

But how do you get people to notice you in the first place? One of the most cost-effective ways is to get people to talk about you naturally. That is what is known as “word of mouth,” or in a broader sense, viral marketing. Link baiting could easily be called viral link-building because the concept is the same: get people to link to you naturally.

Expert marketers are well aware that the best way to get attention is to appeal to others’ emotions. Get others to stand up from their chairs and they will write about you, link to you, and so on. What happens when, instead of appealing to others’ positive emotions, you appeal to their negative ones? Like calling them names, ridiculing them, getting personal. Most of the time you get a lot of attention, but is it worth it?

Let me share a childhood experience that illustrates my point… Read more

What is the problem with generic product names?

If you have read my about page, you already know one of my businesses: NearshoreAgents. You can learn more about what we do by visiting the website.

I want to share a nice little debate I recently had with the company's marketing and sales director, Michael Payne. We were brainstorming the right name for a new product. He wanted a generic name but I strongly refused.

One of the best things about blogging and interacting with potential customers is that you get to understand their needs. This is of tremendous value at the time you are trying to come up with new product ideas.

I review our chat transcripts every day. They tell me a lot about the quality of service we are providing, problems, etc.

At the moment we are only targeting businesses, but we have noticed we are getting service inquires directly from consumers. A lot of people don't know how to solve their PC problems. We saw this as a great opportunity to introduce our first B2C product. Live tech support for end users. I won't get into all the details as that is not the purpose of this post.

Michael wanted to name the product ChatTechSupport. The product name says exactly what we plan to do. It includes the main keywords (search engine friendly) and is not too long.

What is my problem with that name?
Read more